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We assist our clients in achieving their goals by providing the best tax, accounting and management advisory services and by contributing to the growth of our employees, our profession and our community while continuing to cultivate the personal relationships which represent the foundation of our progress.

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Testimonials

"We consider Baum, Smith & Clemens, LLP as our tax accountant, advisor and auditor; they have been a key element in our past successes.  We continue to value their advice and recommendations in meeting future challenges."


Donald R. Shepherd
President
AR Worldwide


Passion is a word that can be used to describe the people who work at Baum, Smith & Clemens, LLP. They have a passion for their job and for helping all of their clients succeed in achieving their financial goals. They strive to present innovative services to help make the firm stand out from their competition and they have helped make BSC one of the most progressive firms in the Philadelphia suburbs. Whether it is traditional or non-traditional services, the zeal and enthusiasm they possess are second to none.

Integrity is another characteristic that distinguishes the BSC family from others. Leadership from the partner group has made this a priority for all BSC employees. Honesty and truthfulness have made them who and what they are today. They are straightforward in offering advice, planning ideas and preparing tax returns and financial statements. Values will not be compromised.

Combining passion and integrity results in providing BSC clients with superior service. Their proactive mentality can lead to positive results and financial success. Baum, Smith & Clemens are in a competitive business and need to be more than number crunchers for their clientele. They are here to help you when you need help. Passion, Integrity and Service; three qualities that make a difference.

 

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From Our Newsletters

Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)





Life expectancies for many Americans have increased to such an extent that most taxpayers who retire at age 65 expect to live for another 20 years or more. Several years ago, a number of insurance companies began to offer a new financial product, often called the longevity annuity or deferred income annuity, which requires upfront payment of a premium in exchange for a guarantee of a certain amount of fixed income starting after the purchaser reaches age 80 or 85. Despite the wisdom behind the longevity annuity, this new type of product did not sell especially well, principally for tax reasons. These roadblocks, however, have largely been removed by new regulations.


The IRS continues to ramp-up its work to fight identity theft/refund fraud and recently announced new rules allowing the use of abbreviated (truncated) personal identification numbers and employer identification numbers. Instead of showing a taxpayer's full Social Security number (SSN) or other identification number on certain forms, asterisks or Xs replace the first five digits and only the last four digits appear. The final rules, however, do impose some important limits on the use of truncated taxpayer identification numbers (known as "TTINs").


On July 22, two federal appeals courts roughly 100 miles apart reached very different conclusions about one of the most widely-used provisions of the Affordable Care Act: the Code Sec. 36B premium assistance tax credit. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit found that the IRS had overreached when it issued regulations providing that individuals who obtain health coverage through a federally-facilitated Affordable Care Act Marketplace are eligible for the tax credit. In contrast, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, sitting in Richmond, Virginia, upheld the IRS regulations as a valid exercise of the agency's authority. The contradictory decisions create a split among the Circuits, which could prompt the U.S. Supreme Court to review the IRS regulations.


Employers may be able to claim a tax credit for a portion of their expenses for providing child care to their employees. Code Sec. 45F allows a employer-provided child care credit, which is a part of the general business credit. Businesses calculate the credit using Form 8882, Credit for Employer-Provided Childcare Facilities and Service, and enter any credit amount on Form 3800, General Business Credit, which must be attached to an employer's tax return.


Taxpayers that plan to operate a business have a variety of choices. A single individual can operate as a C corporation, an S corporation, a limited liability company (LLC), or a sole proprietorship. Two or more individuals can form a partnership, a corporation (C or S), or an LLC.


As an individual or business, it is your responsibility to be aware of and to meet your tax filing/reporting deadlines. This calendar summarizes important tax reporting and filing data for individuals, businesses and other taxpayers for the month of August 2014.