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We assist our clients in achieving their goals by providing the best tax, accounting and management advisory services and by contributing to the growth of our employees, our profession and our community while continuing to cultivate the personal relationships which represent the foundation of our progress.

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Testimonials

"We consider Baum, Smith & Clemens, LLP as our tax accountant, advisor and auditor; they have been a key element in our past successes.  We continue to value their advice and recommendations in meeting future challenges."


Donald R. Shepherd
President
AR Worldwide


Passion is a word that can be used to describe the people who work at Baum, Smith & Clemens, LLP. They have a passion for their job and for helping all of their clients succeed in achieving their financial goals. They strive to present innovative services to help make the firm stand out from their competition and they have helped make BSC one of the most progressive firms in the Philadelphia suburbs. Whether it is traditional or non-traditional services, the zeal and enthusiasm they possess are second to none.

Integrity is another characteristic that distinguishes the BSC family from others. Leadership from the partner group has made this a priority for all BSC employees. Honesty and truthfulness have made them who and what they are today. They are straightforward in offering advice, planning ideas and preparing tax returns and financial statements. Values will not be compromised.

Combining passion and integrity results in providing BSC clients with superior service. Their proactive mentality can lead to positive results and financial success. Baum, Smith & Clemens are in a competitive business and need to be more than number crunchers for their clientele. They are here to help you when you need help. Passion, Integrity and Service; three qualities that make a difference.

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From Our Newsletters

Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)





Tax reform percolates in Washington as the new Congress and the White House continue discussions over the scope and reach of tax legislation this year. Administration officials, lawmakers and Congressional staffers have signaled that off-the-record discussions have dealt with some hefty tax reform proposals but, so far, have released few details of these discussions. At the same time, Senate tax writers have opened up the tax reform process to public input.


Between now and late June, the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule on an important provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: the Code Sec. 36B premium assistance tax credit. The Supreme Court has heard oral arguments in King v. Burwell, 2014-2 ustc ¶50,367, where the plaintiffs argue that the IRS erred in extending the credit to enrollees in federally facilitated Health Insurance Marketplaces (also known as Exchanges).


IRS officials, including Faris Fink, then Commissioner of the Small Business and Self-Employed Division,  announced in 2013 that the IRS would increase its scrutiny of partnership entities. Indeed, the IRS's audit statistics for 2014 have shown that Fink's prediction was accurate. While the overall audit rate for all types of businesses fell from 0.61 percent in Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 to 0.57 percent for FY 2014, the audit rate for partnerships has increased.


There are three main types of IRS audits: correspondence audits, office audits, and field audits (listed in order of increasing invasiveness). Correspondence audits are initiated (and generally conducted) by postal mail. Office audits require a taxpayer and/or its representative to appear in an IRS office; and a field audit involves IRS examiners paying a visit to the taxpayer's place of business.


An employer must withhold income taxes from compensation paid to common-law employees (but not from compensation paid to independent contractors). The amount withheld from an employee's wages is determined in part by the number of withholding exemptions and allowances the employee claims. Note that although the Tax Code and regulations distinguish between withholding exemptions and withholding allowances, the terms are interchangeable. The amount of reduction attributable to one withholding allowance is the same as that attributable to one withholding exemption. Form W-4 and most informal IRS publications refer to both as withholding allowances, probably to avoid confusion with the complete exemption from withholding for employees with no tax liability.


As an individual or business, it is your responsibility to be aware of and to meet your tax filing/reporting deadlines. This calendar summarizes important federal tax reporting and filing data for individuals, businesses and other taxpayers for the month of April 2015.